Thursday, August 31, 2006

The Families of the Werther and Halle Stadt Parishes

A little progress has been made on the KINDERMANN-SCHIERBAUM line -- "little" being the operative word. I found Margaretha Ilsabein KINDERMANN's baptism record, as well as the baptism records of her siblings. I'm still not sure exactly what their father's full name was -- all I can conclude is that it was likely some combination of Friedrich, Wilhelm and Heinrich. Wow. Who would have guessed?

I am no closer to figuring out where Frau KINDERMANN, née SCHIERBAUM, came from, though. These early Halle Stadt (1760s) marriage records are about as devoid of details as it gets: names and the date are all you'll find in most of the entries; no ages or names of parents.

The VOSSIEK family is coming together nicely, though it will likely be several more months before I finish up their Werther church records. Again here, though, I'm having trouble locating the baptism records of what I'll call the "first generation." I know that I'm nearing the beginning of the available records, but it seems like some of these folks just showed up in the area as adults when they were married. I may have to study up on Westphalian history to see if there was an influx of immigrants in the early 18th century.

I'm not sure what to do with the DEPPERMANN family. A marriage record luckily specified Anna Katharina (Margaretha) Ilsabein DEPPERMANN's date of birth and father's name, but one or the other looks to be wrong. There was a girl similarly named born on 6 Sep 1809, but the father's name does not match her marriage record. Not even close. Am I to assume those present at the wedding, including the bride, could recall her exact date of birth, but not her father's name?

Finally, the good news is that I've added two generations to the HOLZ line. Heading into looking for Ferdinand Friedrich HOLZ I was worried that he was not listed in the IGI while hundreds of other children from Werther were indexed. But it turns out that some sections of those records were not indexed and it was easy to find Ferdinand. Now, if I could only find out what happened to him in my own backyard after immigration, that'd be great.

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5 comments:

Lee Anders said...

My heart did a little jump when I saw the SCHIERBAUM surname. The friend I'm helping is the great-grandchild of Frank Herman SCHERBAUM. He settled in NJ after immigrating from Germany, and I'm having a dickens of a time finding any records of him before 1900. He came over about 1880. I never thought of the spelling you use, so now I'm wondering if I should try it.

OK, I simply have to. I'm off...

~ Lee

Dave said...

Well, if you want to spend more time looking for records, here's some "helpful" suggestions based on old Lutheran records: SCHARBAUM, SCHEERBAUM and SCHIRBAUM. And you might drop the "c" to compensate for American records created by those unfamiliar with German.

Lee Anders said...

Yah, already discovered the dropped "c". The man's NJ-bred son dropped it as an adult, as far as I can tell. But the double e's is another new one. Unfortunately, she doesn't know how the name was originally pronounced by her family, and I've had to rely on my own imagination, which is greatly influenced by my Southern accent, of course. It's been interesting to say the least. LOL...

~ Lee

Dave said...

http://www.research.att.com/~ttsweb/tts/demo.php

Try Klara or Reiner.

Lee Anders said...

What will they think of next! Thanks, Dave!